Trump going ahead with taxes on $16B in Chinese imports

FILE- In this March 27, 2018, photo, people record the reveal of the new iPad during an Apple event at Lane Technical College Prep High School in Chicago. The Trump administration’s hit list of Chinese products facing import taxes includes key components used in gadgets that can be wirelessly operated through a smartphone or another device. The tariffs also will nail networking equipment that makes the internet work. Trump has also threatened to impose tariffs on a total of $500 billion worth of Chinese items. That could affect major technology products such as Apple’s iPhones, which are assembled in China. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration announced Tuesday that it will go ahead with imposing 25 percent tariffs on an additional $16 billion in Chinese imports.

Customs officials will begin collecting the border tax Aug. 23, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative said. The list is heavy on industrial products such as steam turbines and iron girders.

Tuesday's announcement was not a surprise. In April, the administration had announced plans to slap tariffs on 1,333 Chinese product lines worth $50 billion a year. After receiving public feedback, it cut 515 products from the list in June and added 284. On July 6, the U.S. began taxing the 818 goods, worth $34 billion, remaining from the April list.

In the meantime, it sought public comment on the new items. On Tuesday, the administration said it had decided to go ahead with tariffs on 279 of the 284 items added in June; they're worth about $16 billion a year.

China has been retaliating in kind.

And the conflict is likely to escalate: The administration is preparing tariffs of up to 25 percent on an additional $200 billion in Chinese products. And President Donald Trump has threatened to impose tariffs on virtually everything China sells to the United States. Chinese imports of goods and services into the United States last year amounted to nearly $524 billion.

The world's two biggest economies are locked in a trade dispute over Washington's charges that China uses predatory tactics in a drive to supplant U.S. technological supremacy. The alleged tactics include cyber-theft and a requirement that American companies hand over trade secrets in exchange for access to the Chinese market.

You may also interested in

Zika researchers seeking volunteers willing to be infected

Aug 19, 2016

Researchers looking for volunteers willing to be infected with the Zika virus as part of effort to develop vaccines

US stocks take small losses as energy companies slide

Aug 19, 2016

US stocks take small losses as the dollar regains a bit of strength and energy companies trade lower

How EpiPen's maker raised prices, and hackles, so much

Aug 23, 2016

Sky-high price hikes for an emergency allergy medicine are making drugmaker Mylan the latest target for patients and politicians infuriated by soaring drug costs

People also read these

Rural church among those providing aid after Louisiana flood

Aug 21, 2016

Rural church among those providing aid, including food and prayer services, after Louisiana flood

Some vacation spots quietly benefit as travelers avoid Zika

Aug 23, 2016

Zika fears are leading some to book away from the Caribbean and Florida

Several tornadoes likely hit Indiana, Ohio; no bad injuries

Aug 25, 2016

Authorities say a wave of severe storms likely produced several tornadoes in Indiana and Ohio, damaging homes and businesses but causing no serious injuries

Emporium Post fulfils the need to know all things about consumers and how businesses can take this opportunity to reach their own customers.

Contact us: sales@emporiumpost.com

Join our mailing list now!