Coogi: Rapper-inspired basketball shirt looks like ours

FILE - In this Feb. 8, 2019, file photo, Brooklyn Nets guard D'Angelo Russell reacts after scoring a 3-point goal during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Chicago Bulls, in New York. The clothing brand Coogi has launched a full-court press against the Brooklyn Nets over a Notorious B.I.G.-inspired jersey. The New York Times says a special version of the team’s jersey is at the center of a copyright lawsuit against the Nets, the National Basketball Association and Nike. The company says a multicolored stripe pattern called “Brooklyn Camo” on the Nike-manufactured “City Edition” jersey copies its designs. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
FILE - In this Feb. 21, 2019, file photo, Brooklyn Nets forwards Rondae Hollis-Jefferson (24) and Ed Davis (17) defend against Portland Trail Blazers guard Damian Lillard, center, during the second half of an NBA basketball game, in New York. The clothing brand Coogi has launched a full-court press against the Brooklyn Nets over a Notorious B.I.G.-inspired jersey. The New York Times says a special version of the team’s jersey is at the center of a copyright lawsuit against the Nets, the National Basketball Association and Nike. The company says a multicolored stripe pattern called “Brooklyn Camo” on the Nike-manufactured “City Edition” jersey copies its designs. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens, File)

NEW YORK — The clothing brand Coogi has launched a full-court press against the Brooklyn Nets over a Notorious B.I.G.-inspired jersey.

The New York Times says a special version of the team's jersey is at the center of a copyright lawsuit against the Nets, the National Basketball Association and Nike.

Coogi is heavily associated with the late rapper, whose real name was Christopher Wallace. He referenced Coogi in some of his songs, including the hit "Hypnotize."

The company says a multicolored stripe pattern called "Brooklyn Camo" on the Nike-manufactured "City Edition" jersey copies its designs.

The lawsuit says the amount of the alleged damages would be "established at trial."

NBA spokesman Mike Bass says the lawsuit has "no merit whatsoever."

The Nets and Nike declined to comment.

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Information from: The New York Times, http://www.nytimes.com

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